Geoff Zeiss

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« Improving the Information Flow at the St Johns River Water Management District | Main | MapGuide Open Source and Community Participation »

November 23, 2006

Comments

Maurizio

I agree: it has not been a traditional GIS conference. Interaction between
delegates was superb. I wish to thank the organizers for their efforts.

I wish to add that the SA 250k and 50k maps are available on line (courtesy
of CDSM) for free download at http://www.madmappers.com

Since 2003, when South Africa first introduced a GIS dissemination policy
based on cost/media (approx US$3/CD) the GIS industry has boomed beyond any
expectation. We do applaude this bold move which has broken the monopoly of
few rich companies (the only ones who could afford to purchase data in the
past)and has resulted in hundreds small GIS companies and software
developers entering the market.

The next step is the introduction in 2007 of GIS as subject in the last 2
years of South African high schools.

It is also very exciting to hear that similar dissemination policies are now
been considered in neighbouring countries. It should be quite obvious by now
that it is the only way to stimulate the birth of a African GIS industry

Ragnvald Larsen

I am working with Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute as an intern/consultant. We are using open source tools like MapServer, MySQL, PHP and Apache. It allows us to work on projects like this one:

http://www.mindland.com/countless_qdgc_demo/

Functional National Spatial Data Infrastructures are important as well. Of those countries supplying development aid to African countries it seems to be more popular to support physical infrastructures. Never minding that the spatial data for the same roads get lost. I believe that it is conditional for any physically manifested work to have the according data in a Spatial Data Infrastructure. Failing to focus on just one of them might prove counter-productive.

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